Procurement threshold values from 1 January 2018

Procurement threshold values from 1 January 2018 for Public Contracts are revised. These revisions are biannual and are showing an increase in the GBP values due to fluctuations in exchange rates over the previous two years. These are the new threshold values which now apply generally in construction under the Public Contracts Regulations 2015. Small Lots are more fully described in PCR 2015 6 (14) (15) but occur where a defined public procurement is defined as otherwise taking place but lots within it may be excluded.

Services & Supplies contracts

Works contracts

Central Government

£118,133

(up from £106,047)

€144,000

£4,551,413

(up from £4,104,394)

€5,548,000

Other Contracting Authorities

£181,302

(up from £164,176)

€221,000

£4,551,413

(up from £4,104,394)

€5,548,000

Small Lots

under PCR 2015 6 (14) (15)

£65,630

(up from £62,842)

€80,000

£820,370

(up from £785,530)

€1,000,000

(With the exception of service contracts under Directive 2014/24/EU Article 74. Article 13 and R & D services under Article 14)

Although these do not so frequently apply within the construction sector, for the thresholds under the Light Touch Regime, thresholds for Social and other specific Services, and thresholds under the Concession Contracts Regulations 2016, Utilities Contracts Regulations 2016, and the Defence and Security Public Contracts Regulations 2011 please refer to Procurement Policy Note PPN 04/17

Open Call for the Venice Biennale 2018

PCompass Open Call for VeniceShort illustrated articles on your experiences of architectural competitions in Europe are invited for the Venice Biennale 2018.

This Open Call is part of a project that aims to improve architectural competitions and  design contests by appraising comparative performances, procedures and outputs across Europe to identify issues and best practices, for their improvement and reform. It  is part of the joint European programme on Competition Culture in Europe by Project Compass, Architectuur Lokaal and A10 New Architecture Co-operative to be presented in the Italian pavilion, Palazzo Widmann at Venice Biennale in May 2018. Outputs will also be available across Europe on thefulcrum.eu.

To submit please let us know, by writing to ProjectCompassCIC@gmail.com with no more than a 3 sentence outline about the subject area(s) you intend to address, at the latest by January 26, 2018. The final deadline for submission is March 2, 2018.

SUBMISSION DETAILS & REQUIREMENTS:

Word length:

  • 400 -1000 words
  • Not including the basic details set out below and any references.

Images:               

  • Min. 2 – Max 6 images. Plans & sections are particularly welcome. Please ensure and confirm the images are licenced creative commons use.

Subject Areas:

  1. Experiences collected from architects who have won Design Contests* abroad, to better understand the conditions that apply after a specific competition win in another country, including the benefits and obstacles. 
  2. Critical reflection by architects on substantive competition issues including their practices and outputs. For example architects are still consciously and frequently participating in bad competitions, it is not self-evident that jurors read the rules first and clients are failing to honour results. 
  3. Collecting data that contributes to misunderstandings and preconceptions in competition culture, including the commonly held beliefs that all problems arise from regulations.
  4. Collecting data into how, in each country, European, national and local laws and regulations are arranged, weighted and customised in competitions so as to provide insights on the benefits and disadvantages of the varied national applications. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION – SEE THE FULL SUBMISSION DETAILS AVAILABLE HERE PCompass Open Call for VeniceWe look forward to receipt of your submission(s) to this Open Call for the Venice Biennale 2018

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Public Interest Challenge & Garden Bridge

Public Interest Challenge & Garden Bridge Oversight. Transcribed below is a letter submitted by Project Compass to the GLA Oversight Committee calling upon them to consider better regulatory policing by means of a Public Interest Challenge for framework procurements, in specified circumstances.

“Dear Len Duvall,

Further to the recent GLA Oversight Committee mtg. of 11 October ‘17  where you called for exploration of future procedural improvements in TfL and the authorities procurement, on behalf of Project Compass CIC I am writing enclosing a proposal for your committees consideration and recommendations forward, along with a supplementary informative.

  1. Under the Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 challenge of unprofessional procurement practice is available to those bidding who are defined within strict limitations as ‘economic operators’ and such challenge may only be within a constrained timescale.

For commercial reasons this can be particularly problematic for private firms, especially when they may seek further work from the awarding authority and that authority has a large and/or dominant market position. In effect they are captured. Pragmatically this conflicts commercial firms, and can in the case of the Garden Bridge procurement and other case study evidence we have researched lead to unprofessional procurement outcomes lacking transparency.

We would propose in future, within the standing orders and governance of a TfL or London wide remit, or by the national provision of a Procurement Policy Note (PPN) or in the longer term by reform of PCR 2015, that consideration might be given to the provision of a Public Interest Challenge, when poor procurement practices become publically apparent.

In this way a higher bar of accountability could contribute towards improving transparency and further professionalising practices to provide better, more effective and efficient procurement. This could address those aspects of the apparent conflicts in the existing procurement regulations.

Our thoughts on how the principle of allowing a public interest challenge might be embodied are set out below……(Letter Items 2 & 3 redacted here)

…. I trust the enclose maybe of value in informing best practice forward.

Kind regards

Walter Menteth

PUBLIC INTEREST CHALLENGE PROPOSAL – NOTES:

……..

It is the definition below which largely appear to preclude a ‘Public Interest Challenge’

PCR 2015 Clause 2(1) Definitions:

“economic operator” means any person or public entity or group of such persons and entities, including any temporary association of undertakings, which offers the execution of works or a work, the supply of products or the provision of services on the market;

PCR 2015 Chapter 6:

Clauses 88 (2)

In regulations 89 and 90, “economic operator” has its usual meaning (in accordance with regulation 2(1)), but in the other provisions of this Part “economic operator” has the narrower meaning of an economic operator (as defined by regulation 2(1)) to which a duty is owed in accordance with regulation 89 or 90

Clause descriptions/definitions however might possibly be clarified by means of a Procurement Policy Note, or within the local GLA or TfL remit by governance/standing orders or ordinances are set out below:

Clause 89(2), 91 (1) The definition of ‘an economic operator’

Proposal: ‘an economic operator which, in consequence suffers or risks suffering, loss or damage’ shall mean the public or their representatives.

Clause 92 (4) & (5) Discretionary extension of the time limit for actioning proceedings.

Proposal: The court shall be required to consider the timescale in which the public or their representatives might reasonably have become conscionably aware.

Clause 93 (5) (b) a summary of the relevant reasons

Proposal: ‘relevant reasons’ shall mean reasons that are evidentially substantial and relevant to the notified award criteria assessed in accordance with these regulations.

Clause 94(1)to(5), 98 (2)(c), 99(c), 102 (6)  The definition of ‘any economic operator’

Proposal: The definition shall have the same meaning as that proposed in clause 91(1) (above)

The key principle being to allow the possibility of a public interest challenge!”

 

‘Competition Culture in Europe 2013-2016’ published.

‘Competition Culture in Europe 2013-2016’ is a new publication resulting from a pan-European survey executed by Project Compass CIC, Architectuur Lokaal and A10 new European Architecture Cooperative.

Continue reading “‘Competition Culture in Europe 2013-2016’ published.”

Design Contest Portals, by country

Design Contest Portals from thirty three European countries that announce architectural design contests and competitive opportunities are now published on thefulcrum.eu .

Open International contests, private contests and opportunities below OJEU thresholds and can also be found through this unique public listing

Produced as part of the four year programmeCompetition Culture in Europeand issued accompanying publication of Competition Culture in Europe 2013-2016, the list makes information more accessible for those seeking to engage.

We will continue to update this list but if you know of a country or a website that is missing, please notify us by email. Many of the results are also included along with the many opportunities and other insights now available.

the independent European portal for architectural competitions & contests.

A synopsis of UK Architectural Competitions Practices & Trends

Project Compass CIC have published a newly commissioned report covering UK architectural competitions that forms part of a comparative evaluation, stocktaking & exploration of European competition culture. It includes some case studies & has been undertaken to collate info. to further research the opportunities & potential expansion of alternative innovatory European practices. PCompass director Walter Menteth has written on some of the findings from the case studies separately in further detail here.

Procurement guide: Better Prospects & Opportunities

PCompass director Walter Menteth will be delivering an RIBA CORE CPD PROGRAMME in 14 English cities over 2017 entitled ‘An Essential Guide to Public Procurement: Better Prospects & More Opportunities’. These seminars are Open to the Public. Details of dates & venues close to you are available here.

The seminar will cover: the background & context; the new regulatory environment; Understanding a competition, the notice and brief  Pre market engagement; RIBA Ten Principles for Procuring Better Outcomes; Competitive bidding; The questions as to how change in procurement culture with better competitive processes and practices can be embedded, will also be addressed.

The seminar will provide: an update on public competition reforms, the principles & contributories, as well as efficiency & effectiveness, SME access & levelling the playing field.  The RIBA Ten Principles for Procuring Better Outcomes will be detailed, including advice on encouraging consortia bids from smaller practices, tips on consultant capability assessment, & selection of suitable building contracts.  Competitive bidding & the bid itself will be explored, including do’s & don’ts on practices strengths & weaknesses, content & tone of responses to a tender invite, & identifying pass/fail areas, as well as understanding learning opportunities from the tender evaluation stage & feedback.

The European Single Procurement Document

The European Single Procurement Document (ESPD) came into force on 26 January 2016, is now aligned to UK procurements and its digital implementation across Europe will be completing in 2017 – What more do you need to know and do? Read more here.

The highlights (and a few low points) of 2016’s design competitions

(This article originally appeared on Dec. 16, 2017 on the Architects’ Journal website, HERE.)

Those with their noses pressed firmly to the grindstone of the public sector will know that 2016 presented an increasingly exasperating array of pungent procedures and cack-handed contracts.

Despite evidence of good practice emerging in isolated pockets across the UK, many of us continued to wrestle with excessively complex, unnecessarily verbose prequalification questionnaires and archaic and bewildering web portals seemingly coded on a Commodore 64.

It was a big year for high-profile cultural projects. The Museum of London began and concluded the selection of a design team for its new Smithfield home, with the award going to a talented team headed by Stanton Williams. Meanwhile, in Essex, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council commenced, abandoned, and began again its search for an architect to take forward the Thames Estuary Museum it had previously awarded back in 2009, but which had ground to a halt in the seven years since AEW’s original scheme won planning. Quite who’s up for taking on this apparently Sisyphean task might become apparent early in the new year.

Continue reading “The highlights (and a few low points) of 2016’s design competitions”

Construction Industry Summit, 20-21 Sept 2016

Project Compass Director Walter Menteth & Patron Angela Brady PPRIBA will be at ‘Buying Smart-Better Procurement’ in this years Construction Industry Summit 20-21/9.Walter will addressing how the G Cloud framework & European Single Procurement Document (ESPD) models provide the construction industry significant opportunities.

Further details here.